N.T. Wright’s “Big Book” on Paul

March 12th, 2013

As many people know, the long-awaited “big book” is about finished. I have had the privilege of reading much of it over the last 10 months. It is well worth the wait is all I will say at the moment. And that it will be out this year. In fact, I will be on a review panel of it at the International SBL meeting in July–at St. Andrews, of course.

The principal volume will be the fourth part of “Christian Origins and the Question of God.” It is now so long that it will be published in two physical books with continuous pagination and one index (at the end of vol. 2). The title? Paul and the Faithfulness of God.

Related titles that will appear with it:

1. Pauline Perspectives: Essays on Paul 1978-2012: essays in journals, books of collected essays, etc. (not officially part of COQG)

2. Paul and His Recent Interpreters: the shortest of the three volumes and originally conceived of as a chapter in the big book.

Stay tuned for further details. In the meantime, here’s the Logos ad for the electronic version.

Nijay Gupta: Double Congratulations

March 12th, 2013

Congrats times two to my good friend Nijay Gupta. He has accepted a tenure-track offer to teach at Northeastern Seminary in Rochester, New York, and he has completed the manuscript of his commentary on Colossians, which will be out quite soon from Smith & Helwys. Way to go, Nijay!

Here is my blurb for the commentary:

From this perceptive commentary’s very first sentence, Nijay Gupta—a significant newer voice in Pauline studies—takes us into the heart of Colossians as few recent interpreters have done. Readers will be inspired by his passion, enlightened by his balanced scholarship, and enriched by his profound theological engagement with the text. This well-written and truly enjoyable volume is a superb addition to an excellent, user-friendly series. It will stimulate students, pastors, theologians, and scholars for many years to come.

Moon Rising

February 7th, 2013

This amazing video of the moon rising over New Zealand (sent via FB by friends at St Johns College, Nottingham, England) reminds me of Psalm 8–who are we that God is mindful of us?? (I wish I could get my WordPress to allow me to post the photo.)

International Ecclesia (Church) and Ethics Conference/Webinar

January 21st, 2013

Announcing an international Ecclesia (Church) and Ethics Conference/Webinar with NT Wright, Stanley Hauerwas, Shane Claiborne, yours truly, and others: May 18 and 25. Get more info now!

This unique conference costs only $10 in the form of a donation to a charity!

General  Information

Ecclesia and Ethics: An Eco-friendly and Economically-feasible Online Biblical Studies and Theology Conference is an academic and ecclesial conference taking place on Saturday May 18th and Saturday May 25th 2013 in real-time via the high-tech Webinar site http://www.gotomeeting.com. No software will need to be purchased by presenters or attendees, and Webinar access is provided entirely for free due to a generous Capod Innovation Grant through the University of St Andrews in Scotland. Participants and attendees will be able to sign on, present, and listen to or watch presentations from anywhere in the world with reliable internet and a computer. Registration for the conference consists of a $10/£7 (minimum) donation to one of our Recommended Charities. We invite participants to give according to their means above the $10/£7 to one or more of our charities if they feel led and are able.

Main papers will be presented by our Main Speakers: N.T. Wright, Michael Gorman, Dennis Hollinger, Shane Claiborne, Stanley Hauerwas, Brian Rosner, Mariam Kamell, and Nijay Gupta. Additionally, we will have five Multiple Paper sessions throughout the conference, via five Virtual Rooms which will feature papers from a total of 20-25 selected papers. Interested parties are invited to submit an abstract to ecclesiaethics@gmail.com for consideration from January 2013-March 2013.

All conference presenters (both Main Paper and Multiple Paper session presenters) will be allotted a 40 minute time slot with an additional 10 minutes designated for Q+A (50 minutes total). All presentations will be recorded as videos and available for viewing by registered conference attendees with a provided password through T&T Clark’s website. T&T Clark will also be publishing selected proceedings from the conference as a book.

Nestle-Aland 28 Greek NT Now Online

December 27th, 2012

Here it is.

And here is a Christmas message:

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Seven Last Words about Paul as Pastor

December 13th, 2012

The outline of my final presentation for the course “Pauline Spirituality for Church and Ministry.” Forgive the alliteration!

Paul as Pastor

The Seven Last Words

M. Gorman

  1. Proclamation—of the gospel of God = the missio Dei
  2. Participation—cruciform embodiment of the gospel/interchange in Christ
  3. Passion—zeal
  4. Parenting—like a mother and a father
  5. Partnership—with God and with others
  6. Prayer—praising God; interceding for others; requesting prayer support
  7. Purpose—individual and communal transformation into the image of God in Christ by the power of the Spirit = interchange in Christ = becoming the justice/righteousness of God = cruciform embodiment of the gospel = participation in the missio Dei

My Spring Course on N.T. Wright

November 30th, 2012

If you are anywhere in the Baltimore–DC–Wilimington–York, PA–Northern Virginia area and you appreciate the work of N.T. Wright, you may wish to consider my spring course at the Ecumenical Institute of Theology at St. Mary’s Seminary & University. This is a graduate course, but there are no prerequisites other than having a bacherlor’s degree with a decent GPA. The course is available for credit or audit.

BS/ST509/709 The Writings of N.T. Wright

Thursday, 6-9 p.m., January 14-March 21 (3 graduate credits)

[This is a combination biblical and systematic theology course offered at beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels.]

Course Description:

An exploration of some of the biblical, theological, and pastoral writings of the contemporary British Anglican scholar N.T. Wright, with attention to the significance of his work for the life of the church.

Course Requirements for all students:

1. Regular attendance and prepared participation in class discussion.

2. Five 100-word reaction posts online (not due when doing discussion-starter paper).

3. Two one-page discussion-starter papers, with summary and discussion questions.

4. One book review of 2,000 words.

5. Class presentation and final, synthetic paper of 2,000 words on some aspect of N. T. Wright’s writings.

Additional Requirement for 700-level students (matriculated degree and certificate candidates):

Same as above plus one additional book review on an additional book by N.T. Wright.

For C.A.S. (Certificate of Advanced Studies) students, the additional book must be a major work approved by the instructor.

Required Texts:

Kurt, Stephen. Tom Wright for Everyone: Putting the Theology of N.T. Wright into Practice in the Local Church. 978-0281063932.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). For All God’s Worth: The Worship and Calling of the Church. 978-0802843197.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). Simply Christian: Why Christianity Makes Sense. 978-0061920622.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). Simply Jesus: A New Vision of Who He Was, What He Did, and Why He Matters. 978-0062084392.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church. 978-0061551826.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). What Saint Paul Really Said: Was Paul of Tarsus the Real Founder of Christianity? 978-0802844453.

Some additional online reading and video viewing.

Recommended:

Perrin, Nicholas and Richard B. Hays, eds. Jesus, Paul, and the People of God. 978-0830838974.

Applications for the Ecumenical Institute’s 2013 spring term are due by Monday, December 3, though late applications will be considered. For admission requirements, go to http://www.stmarys.edu/ei/ei_adm_overview.htm, or contact Zenaida Bench at zbench@stmarys.edu or 410/864-4202. Registration continues until spring-term classes begin. See the course brochure at http://www.stmarys.edu/ei/ei_semester.htm for an overview of all of next term’s course offerings.

We believe there is no better way to begin study at the Ecumenical Institute than walking and talking with a friend (see Luke 24:13-14). To encourage that, we offer a one-time tuition incentive for new students who begin together: a tuition remission of 50% for both of you on your first “E.I.” course.

If you and someone you know are considering theological study, this is your opportunity to encourage one another to explore and discern together. You can take the same class or try different courses and compare notes.

Your walk begins with just one course… and may lead to…

  • more courses…
  • or perhaps a certificate in Biblical Studies, Faith Community/Parish Nursing, Religious Education, Spirituality, Urban Ministry, or Youth and Family Ministry…
  • or even a Master of Arts Degree in Theology or Church Ministries.

For more information, please contact the Ecumenical Institute office at ei@stmarys.edu or 410/864-4200.

Theses on Reading and Preaching from the Gospel of John

November 29th, 2012

Following is the outline of my final lecture on the Gospel of John for my seminary course on Johannine Literature:

  • The best way to read and preach John is to enter its narrative, symbolic, and theological world, and to invite your hearers to do the same.
  • The jury is still out, and perhaps always will be out, on certain so-called “introductory issues”—the author(s), the precise historical situation of the community (if there was one), etc. Do not build your preaching and teaching on these matters.
  • There is an increasing scholarly acceptance of the historical basis in the life of Jesus of many of the events and sayings in John. Again, the jury is still out on many issues and details, but there are two mistakes to avoid:
    • Don’t say, “This is a spiritual gospel that is not intended to depict the real, historical Jesus as the Synoptic Gospels do, but only the Christ of faith.”
    • Don’t say, “This is an exact word-for-word account of precisely what Jesus said and did without interpretation.” This claim is not true of any canonical gospel because in antiquity oral transmission lent itself to both faithful transmission and appropriate interpretation.
    • The main purposes of the Gospel of John are christological and soteriological: to proclaim Jesus as the Son of God, Messiah/King of Israel, and Savior of the World who was sent by God the Father to give the world eternal life (life in intimate knowledge of Father, Son, and Paraclete/Spirit) now and forever.
    • This joy-filled and peace-filled life is offered as a gift that must be believed and received; nurtured by word and sacrament; and embodied in such concrete practices as love, unity, forgiveness, evangelization, and pastoral care.
    • The spirituality of John is rich, deep, and multifaceted; it may perhaps be summarized as the mutual indwelling (abiding) of believers and the Triune God that creates a community of disciples, the people of the new covenant, that worships God and participates in the divine mission of bringing abundant life to the world through witness in word and deed to the self-giving love of the crucified and glorified Jesus.
    • The gospel of John is both an invitation to life in the Father/Son/Paraclete and a word of reassurance that, in the physical absence of Jesus, believers can rely on the Paraclete as their teacher, guide, inspiration, and aide, even in times of persecution. It is a gospel for non-believers, but also for new believers, doubting and fence-sitting believers, missional believers, persecuted believers—in other words, a gospel for all people.

    Inaugural Lecture PLUS a Seminar on Paul Nov. 8-9

    October 27th, 2012

    Nov. 8: Raymond E. Brown Inaugural Lecture and

    Nov. 9: A Morning with the Apostle Paul (and Friends)

    If you are anywhere near Baltimore, you are cordially invited!!

    On Thursday, November 8 I will deliver my inaugural lecture as the first holder of the Raymond E. Brown Chair in Biblical Studies and Theology at St. Mary’s Seminary & University. The topic will be “The Death of the Messiah: Theology, Spirituality, Politics.” A book sale and signing will precede the lecture at 7 p.m., and a period of dialogue will follow. This event, which is also this year’s Dunning Lecture, is free and open to the public.
    Click for lecture information.

    On the morning after the lecture, the conversation will continue as other biblical scholars and theologians (Richard Hays, Kathy Grieb, Fr. Tom Stegman, and Brent Laytham) will join me for “A Morning with the Apostle Paul (and Friends),” a discussion of some of the themes from my work on Paul and their significance both for understanding Paul and for the life and mission of the church today. Advance registration for this seminar is required, and space is limited.
    Click for seminar details and registration form.

    Karl Menninger on War

    October 15th, 2012

    “War is surely the great, prototypical example of group sin. It is a massive, organized violation of all ethics and all laws, a purposive and sanctioned campaign of destructiveness. All behaviors normally regarded as criminal and/or sinful are suddenly sanctioned–murder, mayhem, arson, robbery, deceit, trespassing, sabotage, vandalism, and cruelty…. The whole war business is a horrible, irrational, despicable business, an archaic and traditional method of deciding a disputed point, whose survival is a disgrace to and refutation of civilization…. And the whole business is disguised in a cloak of romantic glory and sentiment which makes it palatable and even marketable, as fiction, drama, etc., and spoke of in terms of ‘pride’ and ‘glory.’… Why don’t we outlaw war just as we have long since outlawed cannibalism? How much more horrible it is than cannibalism, which so shocks our sensibilities.”

    –Karl Menninger, Whatever Became of Sin?, 101–103 (1973)


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