Archive for the ‘Theological interpretation’ Category

Ecclesia and Ethics Conference–May 18 and 25

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

If you are interested in the life of the church, the moral life, and theological scholarship in service of both, consider participating in the international online Webinar Ecclesia and Ethics, May 18 and 25. Go to ecclesiaethics.com. You can also see online interviews with some of the speakers, including yours truly and Tom Wright.

Ecclesia and Ethics Conference Update

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

It’s just under two months until the international biblical studies and theology conference on the church and ethics. There are great video interviews with some of the main speakers at the ecclesiaethics web site, with videos or other interview formats with Tom Wright, Shane Claiborne, and others, including one with yours truly.

Inaugural Lecture PLUS a Seminar on Paul Nov. 8-9

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

Nov. 8: Raymond E. Brown Inaugural Lecture and

Nov. 9: A Morning with the Apostle Paul (and Friends)

If you are anywhere near Baltimore, you are cordially invited!!

On Thursday, November 8 I will deliver my inaugural lecture as the first holder of the Raymond E. Brown Chair in Biblical Studies and Theology at St. Mary’s Seminary & University. The topic will be “The Death of the Messiah: Theology, Spirituality, Politics.” A book sale and signing will precede the lecture at 7 p.m., and a period of dialogue will follow. This event, which is also this year’s Dunning Lecture, is free and open to the public.
Click for lecture information.

On the morning after the lecture, the conversation will continue as other biblical scholars and theologians (Richard Hays, Kathy Grieb, Fr. Tom Stegman, and Brent Laytham) will join me for “A Morning with the Apostle Paul (and Friends),” a discussion of some of the themes from my work on Paul and their significance both for understanding Paul and for the life and mission of the church today. Advance registration for this seminar is required, and space is limited.
Click for seminar details and registration form.

A New Essay in a New Book on Revelation

Saturday, June 16th, 2012

In September 2010 I was part of an international symposium on the book of Revelation held at Duke University. The papers from that very stimulating event are about to be published (July 15) in a volume from Baylor University Press entitled Revelation and the Politics of Apocalyptic Interpretation, edited by Richard B. Hays and Stefan Alkier.

The table of contents follows:

1 What Has the Spirit Been Saying? Theological and Hermeneutical Reflections on the Reception/Impact History of the Book of Revelation (me)

2 Models for Intertextual Interpretation of Revelation (Steve Moyise)

3 The Reception of Daniel 7 in the Revelation of John (Thomas Hieke)

4 Faithful Witness, Alpha and Omega: The Identity of Jesus in the Apocalypse of John (Richard Hays)

5 God, Israel, and Ecclesia in the Apocalypse (Joseph Mangina)

6 Revelation and Christian Hope: Political Implications of the Revelation to John (N. T. Wright)

7 Witness or Warrior? How the Book of Revelation Can Help Christians Live Their Political Lives (Stefan Alkier)

8 The Apocalypse in the Framework of the Canon (Tobias Nicklas)

9 Reading What Is Written in the Book of Life: Theological Interpretation of the Book of Revelation Today (Marianne Meye Thompson)

The book blurbs follow:

“For many Revelation has effectively been decanonized—mostly little read and even less understood. This fine collection ventures into intertextual, canonical, theological, and political readings of the book that advance theological reflection on the significance of Revelation for today.”

—Joel B. Green, Professor of New Testament Interpretation & Associate Dean for the Center for Advanced Theological Studies, Fuller Theological Seminary

“A splendid collection. This volume will help both the seasoned and the skittish interpret Revelation within its canonical context, and thereby move the academy and the church within hearing distance of apocalyptic texts in the gospels and epistles.”

—Eugene Boring, I. Wylie Briscoe Professor of New Testament, Emeritus, Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University

If you are interested in Revelation, you will want to get this book, along (I would suggest) with Reading Revelation Responsibly (a bit lighter reading!).

Interpreting the Psalms at SBL

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

SBL members who are interested in theological interpretation of the psalms–the Theological Interpretation of Scripture seminar of SBL will have an open session on theological interpretation of the psalms at the November meeting in Chicago. It’s not too late to submit a proposal. Visit us at the SBL web site. (The deadline is March 1.) Questions? Email me!

Justification Lectures tomorrow and Saturday

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

I will be the G. Arthur Keough Lecturer in the Department of Religion at Washington Adventist University in Takoma Park, MD, on Friday and Saturday, March 18-19. The topic is “Reimagining Justification According to St. Paul”:

7 p.m. Friday: “The End of Justification as We Know It”
respondent: Fr. Frank Matera, Catholic University

10 a.m. Saturday: “Justification as Resurrection from the Dead”

3:30. p.m. Saturday: “Justification and Justice”
respondent: Dr. Stephen Fowl, Loyola University

If you are in or near D.C., come on out!

A Pauline Missional Hermeneutic (1)

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

I was recently asked to write a short article on reading Paul missionally. Here’s an excerpt; the full piece will appear in a publication for seminarians called Catalyst.

In his very readable published dissertation, Mission and Moral Reflection in Paul (Peter Lang, 2006) Michael Barram (St. Mary’s College of California) argues that “mission” is not a discrete aspect of Paul’s work, such as evangelism and initial community formation, but a principal rubric for understanding the apostle’s entire vocation, including moral reflection and ongoing community nurturing. Paul’s letters are therefore “mission documents.” If Barram is right, as I think he is, then we need to read Paul’s letters in two ways: first, as witnesses to Paul’s understanding of God’s mission, his role in it, and the place of his congregations in it; and, second, as scriptural texts for our own missional identity, our contemporary vocational and ecclesial self-understanding and practices. Thus is born a Pauline missional hermeneutic.

In a Pauline missional hermeneutic, the guiding question is “How do we read Paul for what he says about the missio Dei and about our participation in it?” In other words, the issue before us is not primarily exegetical or historical, but hermeneutical. What is a Pauline letter? (a mission document). How are we to read it appropriately? (missionally). Older historical and exegetical questions—e.g., about how and whom Paul evangelized, and whether he expected his communities to do the same—are still relevant, but they will not be our primary concerns, and they are not ends in themselves. Rather, they are part of a larger discussion about Paul and mission. Together with all kinds of new questions that emerge from this enlarged understanding, they serve as a means to our own theological and missiological reflection.

SBL-Bound

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

Tomorrow I leave for the 2010 SBL (Society of Biblical Literature) meeting in Atlanta. This is always a great time of seeing old friends, meeting new people, hearing interesting papers, seeing (and often buying) new books, meeting with publishers and potential publishers, etc. Atlanta is not my favorite place for a conference; the downtown area is unexciting compared to, say, New Orleans, San Antonio, San Francisco, or Boston. As I said to a good friend yesterday, Atlanta is a nice place to live but not such a great place to visit.

The conference will be good, however. N.T. Wright holds forth on justification, with respondents, tomorrow evening for the IBR (Institute for Biblical Research). I will chair a session on historical criticism and theological interpretation Saturday morning, featuring three fine papers, including one by Joel Green. Then I will attend the section on missional hermeneutics, focusing on exile, early Saturday afternoon. (I’m on the steering committee of both these groups, and I highly recommend both sessions.) After that, I’m not sure, except for the other session for the theological interpretation of Christian Scripture group. There’s an excellent buffet from which to choose!

Brief reports to come later.

“Reading Revelation Responsibly” is Out

Monday, November 8th, 2010

The good folks at Wipf and Stock/Cascade have miraculously turned my book around in record time. I got copies today for a talk and book signing this Friday. Here is the link to look at and order it. It is available now at 20% off, though Wipf and Stock may soon do a 40%-off email coupon to its regular subscribers. The official publication date is 2011, so don’t expect to see it on Amazon, etc. until some time in December.

The key to this book is the subtitle: Uncivil Worship and Witness: Following the Lamb into the New Creation.

I would post a photo of the beautiful cover here, but, alas, I can’t get images to work in WordPress, so you will have to go to the site.

If you are in the Baltimore-DC area, come out to St. Mary’s Seminary & University in Baltimore Friday evening at 7 p.m. More information is here.

BTW, the info about me on the Wipf and Stock web site is 9 years old, so it is about to be updated.

Lund NT Lectures in Chicago Postponed

Saturday, September 18th, 2010

Due to my father’s hospitalization, I will be unable to give the Lund New Testament Lectures at North Park Seminary in Chicago this Wednesday, nor will I be at the North Park Symposium on the Theological Interpretation of Scripture. I am disappointed but it has to be.

I hope to post most of the North Park paper (which is completed and submitted) in the coming weeks. Otherwise preoccupied at the moment.

The lectures will be rescheduled.


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