Archive for the ‘Paul’ Category

Cities of Paul and John Study Tour: April 17-29, 2017

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Study Tour
The Cities of Paul and John
The Best of Turkey, Greece, and Rome

April 17-29, 2017

A once-in-a-lifetime and potentially life-changing experience!

Join me for my eighth (and possibly last) study tour to the cities of Paul and John. Participants may take the trip as a course for credit (graduate or undergraduate—reading and writing required) or just as an educational and spiritual adventure. Family members (18+) and friends are welcome.

Included: Roundtrip air from Washington, DC, including current air taxes and fuel surcharges (taxes and fuel charges are subject to change); 11 nights lodging at 4-star hotels; breakfast and dinner daily; full-time English-speaking tour escorts; air-conditioned deluxe motor coach; all guides, entrances, touring and transportation as appears on itinerary; baggage handling at hotels (one piece).

Not included: all lunches; drinks with meals; Turkey Visa (must purchase online prior to travel); tips to driver, guides, hotel staff (required; approx. $100-$120; collected at departure); optional travel insurance; fee for paying for trip by credit card (3-5%); transportation to and from airport (probably Dulles).

Highlights: Morning prayer en route to sites; great fellowship with an interesting, diverse group of people; expert guiding; Scripture reading and discussion of relevant texts on site; encounters with people from other cultures and their countries; pre-trip and in-trip recommended reading.

Finances: Approx. $4,500 as of May 12, 2016 (subject to final airline fares and taxes); cost is based on double occupancy (single-room supplement = approx. $600); deposit due late fall.

Tentative Itinerary as of May 12. 2016 (subject to minor changes)

Monday Day 1 Depart Washington DC

Tuesday Day 2 Arrive in Izmir (Smyrna); visit Smyrna agora; drive to Kusadasi (ON Kusadasi)

Wednesday Day 3 Ephesus: main site including terrace houses and St. Paul caves (ON Kusadasi)

Thursday Day 4 Ephesus: museum and Mary’s House; travel inland (ON Pamukkale)

Friday Day 5 Laodicea; Hierapolis (ON Pamukkale)

Saturday Day 6 Colossae; Sardis (ON Bergma)

Sunday Day 7 Pergamum (Acropolis and Asclepeion); fly Izmir-Athens (ON Athens)

Monday Day 8 Athens: Acropolis, Mars Hill, Forum, Archaeological Museum; panoramic drive (ON Athens)

Tuesday Day 9 Corinth, Acrocorinth, Isthmia, Cenchreae (ON Athens)

Wednesday Day 10 Fly Athens-Rome; Roman Forum and Colosseum (ON Rome)

Thursday, Day 11 Rome: St. John Lateran, Appian Way, Catacombs, and St. Paul Outside the Walls Basilica (ON Rome)

Friday, Day 12 Rome: Vatican (Museums and Sistine Chapel), St. Peter’s Basilica; walking tour of the old city; special farewell dinner (ON Rome)

Saturday, Day 13 Flight home

Further information and to get on the mailing list for updates
Prof. Michael J. Gorman:

Lectures at Moody Bible Institute and Fuller Seminary April 4, 6-7

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

If you are in the Chicago area, I will be giving a lecture for the Moody Student Theological Society at the Moody Bible Institute next Monday, April 4 at 7:00 pm in room Sweeting 211. It is open to the public. The title of the lecture is “Salvation Through Crucifixion: Paul’s Theology of Participating in Christ.” But don’t worry too much–there will be plenty of resurrection in the talk.

I will also be giving the Payton Lectures at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday and Thursday, April 6-7. The theme is “Reading John Missionally.” The first lecture is titled “Missional Gospel, Missional Jesus: The Gospel of Abundant Life.” The second is “Abide and Go: John’s Missional Spirituality.”

All lectures are open to the public, but at Fuller you need to arrive early and register.

Participation in God’s Mission at Northeastern Seminary

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016

I will be at Northeastern Seminary in Chili, NY (Rochester) for their theology conference on Participation in God’s Mission this Friday and Saturday. If you are in the area, come by for the Friday night free lecture. The Saturday event has a fee, but there is a keynote from me and then some 40 choices for academic papers.

Friday evening’s 7:30 lecture is entitled “Paul, the Mission of God, and the Contemporary Church.”

Peace and the Gospel: “Peace in Paul and Luke”

Friday, October 23rd, 2015

Some of you may be interested in this little book I just published on peace.

Becoming the Gospel: Quotations Etc for My Clergy Presentation

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

Sharing in God’s Life, Becoming the Gospel: Paul and the Missional Church
Michael J. Gorman

A few thoughts to get us started . . .

  • “The Church exists by mission, just as a fire exists by burning. Where there is no mission, there is no Church. . . .” Emil Brunner
  •  “The first-order business of the church is to be a people who under the guidance of the Spirit point the world to Jesus Christ. . . . I take it to be crucial that Christians must live in a manner that their lives are unintelligible if the God we worship in Jesus Christ does not exist. . . . I believe we are living in a time when Christendom is actually coming to an end. That is an extraordinary transition whose significance for Christian and non-Christian has yet to be understood. But in the very least, it means the church is finally free to be a politic [a distinctive public culture].” Stanley Hauerwas
  •  “A primary role of Scripture in the church is to bring about the conversion of the imagination.” Richard Hays
  •  “How is it possible that the gospel should be credible, that people should come to believe that the power which has the last word in human affairs is represented by a man hanging on a cross? I am suggesting that the only answer, the only hermeneutic [means of interpretation] of the gospel, is a congregation of men and women who believe it and live by it.” Lesslie Newbigin
  •  “The church is a community of Christ’s crucified presence and of Christ’s risen presence.” Ross Hastings
  •   Paul “saw the church as a microcosmos, a little world, not simply as an alternative to the present one, an escapist’s country cottage for those tired of city life, but as the prototype of what was to come . . . [when] the whole earth [would be filled] with his knowledge and glory, with his justice, peace and joy. Paul sees each ekkl?sia as a sign of that future reality.” (N.T. Wright)

And a few more:
• “He became what we are so that we could become what He is.” Irenaeus and Athanasius
• “Like an iron sword plunged into the fire that becomes hot and luminous while remaining iron and not becoming fire, so are we when plunged into Christ the image of God.” Maximus the Confessor
• “What Christ is to us — righteousness, wisdom, sanctification, redemption — Christians must now be to the world.” (Morna Hooker)
• The church’s mission is not to be palatable but to be credible: speaking clearly, acting faithfully. (MJG)
• Paul wanted the church not merely to believe the gospel but to become the gospel and thereby to advance the gospel, thus participating in the very life and mission of God (the missio Dei). (MJG)
• The church is to be a living exegesis of the gospel. (MJG)

Paul on the cross
• The cross is God’s benign invasion into the world to set it right, which includes your forgiveness and eternal life, but much more.
• The cross is not only a Christophany; it is also a theophany, revealing the power and wisdom of God.
• The cross challenges every status quo: religious, political, social, etc.
• The cross has two beams, vertical and horizontal, meaning reconciliation with God and with one another.
• The cross is not only the source, but also the shape, of our salvation. Salvation means renewal by participation in Christ.
• The mission of the church is simply, in the power of the resurrection and the Spirit, to live the story of the cross in its internal and its public life. This is what it means to be godly, Christlike, Spirit-filled—to take part in God’s life and story.
• Ironically and paradoxically, the cross and cross-shaped ministry bring about resurrection; death leads to life.

Participation in the fellowship of the cross

5Let the same mind be in you [plural] that was in Christ Jesus, 6who, though he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be exploited, 7but emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, being born in human likeness. And being found in human form, 8he humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death— even death on a cross.

Although [x] not [y] but [z]
Although [status] not [selfish exploitation] but [z] missional self-giving

NRSV, alt. (MJG)
5Let this mind [see 2:1-4] be in you [plural], which means in Christ Jesus, 6who, because he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be exploited, 7but emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, being born in human likeness. And being found in human form, 8he humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death— even death on a cross.

Because [x] not [y] but [z]
Because [status] not [selfish exploitation] but [z] missional self-giving

Interview with Eerdmans about “Becoming the Gospel”

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

Eerdmans has posted an interview with me about my new book, Becoming the Gospel: Paul, Participation, and Mission.

Cover-Becoming the Gospel

“Becoming the Gospel” is Out

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

For all who may be interested, you may now order my newest book, Becoming the Gospel: Paul, Participation, and Mission, from Eerdmans (the publisher), Amazon, or your good theological bookstore, such as Hearts and Minds Books in Dallastown, PA.

The “thesis” of the book is pretty straightforward:

The central claim, found in the title — Becoming the Gospel: Paul, Participation, and Mission — is that already in the first Christian century the apostle Paul wanted the communities he addressed not merely to believe the gospel but to become the gospel and thereby to advance the gospel.

I will let Chris Tilling of St. Mellitus College and author of Paul’s Divine Christology say something about the book:

Combining exegesis of Paul’s letters with hermeneutics and missiology, Gorman throws new light on old debates such as those involving the language of God’s righteousness and various participatory themes. . . . Gorman writes in ways that resonate with the missional concerns of the gospel itself.

Cover-Becoming the Gospel

When asked who should read this book, I have responded “Everyone!” :-) Everyone!
First of all pastors, seminary students, and lay leaders in the churches. This is challenging but readable material. I want to spark conversations in the church. Secondly, biblical scholars, missiologists, theologians, and others who teach in and influence the various fields of study that come together in this book.

Paul and Apocalyptic

Monday, July 21st, 2014

Professors Ben Blackwell of Houston Baptist University, John Goodrich of Moody, and Jason Maston of Highland Theological College have organized a pre-SBL conference on Paul and Apocalyptic at which I will be presenting a paper. If you plan to be in San Diego for SBL, or even if you don’t, think about attending this (taken from  Dunelm Road blog):

With all the debates over the last few years at SBL about the nature of Apocalyptic in Paul, we here at Dunelm (John, Jason and Ben) thought we would facilitate a Pauline cage match to let the different schools of thought engage one another directly. So, plan to come to SBL early to catch this Friday afternoon session. You won’t want to miss this line-up. The fruits of this discussion will come out afterwards in a volume with Fortress Press.

Paul and the Apocalyptic Imagination (S21-201)

11/21/2014 (FRIDAY)
12:30 PM to 5:30 PM
Room: 300 A (Level 3 (Aqua)) – Hilton Bayfront (HB)
Across various branches of biblical and theological study, there is a renewed interest in ‘apocalyptic’. This development is seen particularly in the study of Paul’s theology, where it is now widely agreed that Paul promotes an ‘apocalyptic theology’. However, there is little agreement on what this means. Scholars from different perspectives have, as a result, continued to talk past each other. This special session provides an opportunity for leading Pauline scholars from different perspectives to engage in discussion about the meaning of Paul as an apocalyptic thinker. Indeed, one of the strengths and aims of this event is that different and opposing views are set next to each other. The session will hopefully bring greater clarity to the ‘apocalyptic’ reading of Paul by providing much needed definition to central terms and interpretive approaches and by highlighting both their strengths and weaknesses.

Session 1
Jason Maston, Highland Theological College, Welcome (5 min)
M. C. de Boer, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam – VU University Amsterdam
Apocalyptic as Eschatological Activity (25 min)
N.T. Wright, University of St. Andrews
Apocalyptic as Heavenly Communication (25 min)
Loren Stuckenbruck, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Apocalypticism in Second Temple Judaism (25 min)
Philip Ziegler, University of Aberdeen
Apocalypticism in Modern Theology (25 min)
Discussion (15 min)
Break (15 min)

Session 2
Ben Blackwell, Houston Baptist University, Presiding
Michael Gorman, Saint Mary’s Seminary and University
The Apocalyptic New Covenant and the Shape of Life in the Spirit (25 min)
Edith Humphrey, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary
Apocalypse as Theoria in Paul: A New Perspective on Apocalyptic as Mother of Theology (25 min)
Douglas Campbell, Duke University
Paul’s Apocalyptic Epistemology (25 min)
Beverly Gaventa, Baylor University
Romans 9–11: An Apocalyptic Reading (25 min)
John Barclay, University of Durham
Apocalyptic Investments: 1 Corinthians 7 and Pauline Ethics (25 min)
Discussion (20 min)

Interviews with N. T. Wright about Paul and the Faithfulness of God

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

I recently conducted two interviews here at St. Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore (where I teach) with my good friend N. T. (Tom) Wright about his new book, Paul and the Faithfulness of God. The videos are now on YouTube. In the first, I talk just with Tom; in the second, I moderate a conversation on Paul between Tom and Professor Richard Hays, another good friend, of Duke Divinity School.

Each interview lasts about 35 minutes.

I encourage all educators to share these with their students!

Going to the Grotto of St. Paul?

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013

Travelers to Turkey: Have you been to the Grotto of St. Paul in Ephesus? If so, would you recommend it? What was your experience of it? (Time to get there and back.) I have permission to take a group up to it, just deciding if I have the time and if it is worth it. I think it is…. What’s your view?