Archive for the ‘Biblical Scholars & Theologians’ Category

Nijay Gupta: Double Congratulations

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013

Congrats times two to my good friend Nijay Gupta. He has accepted a tenure-track offer to teach at Northeastern Seminary in Rochester, New York, and he has completed the manuscript of his commentary on Colossians, which will be out quite soon from Smith & Helwys. Way to go, Nijay!

Here is my blurb for the commentary:

From this perceptive commentary’s very first sentence, Nijay Gupta—a significant newer voice in Pauline studies—takes us into the heart of Colossians as few recent interpreters have done. Readers will be inspired by his passion, enlightened by his balanced scholarship, and enriched by his profound theological engagement with the text. This well-written and truly enjoyable volume is a superb addition to an excellent, user-friendly series. It will stimulate students, pastors, theologians, and scholars for many years to come.

International Ecclesia (Church) and Ethics Conference/Webinar

Monday, January 21st, 2013

Announcing an international Ecclesia (Church) and Ethics Conference/Webinar with NT Wright, Stanley Hauerwas, Shane Claiborne, yours truly, and others: May 18 and 25. Get more info now!

This unique conference costs only $10 in the form of a donation to a charity!

General  Information

Ecclesia and Ethics: An Eco-friendly and Economically-feasible Online Biblical Studies and Theology Conference is an academic and ecclesial conference taking place on Saturday May 18th and Saturday May 25th 2013 in real-time via the high-tech Webinar site http://www.gotomeeting.com. No software will need to be purchased by presenters or attendees, and Webinar access is provided entirely for free due to a generous Capod Innovation Grant through the University of St Andrews in Scotland. Participants and attendees will be able to sign on, present, and listen to or watch presentations from anywhere in the world with reliable internet and a computer. Registration for the conference consists of a $10/£7 (minimum) donation to one of our Recommended Charities. We invite participants to give according to their means above the $10/£7 to one or more of our charities if they feel led and are able.

Main papers will be presented by our Main Speakers: N.T. Wright, Michael Gorman, Dennis Hollinger, Shane Claiborne, Stanley Hauerwas, Brian Rosner, Mariam Kamell, and Nijay Gupta. Additionally, we will have five Multiple Paper sessions throughout the conference, via five Virtual Rooms which will feature papers from a total of 20-25 selected papers. Interested parties are invited to submit an abstract to ecclesiaethics@gmail.com for consideration from January 2013-March 2013.

All conference presenters (both Main Paper and Multiple Paper session presenters) will be allotted a 40 minute time slot with an additional 10 minutes designated for Q+A (50 minutes total). All presentations will be recorded as videos and available for viewing by registered conference attendees with a provided password through T&T Clark’s website. T&T Clark will also be publishing selected proceedings from the conference as a book.

My Spring Course on N.T. Wright

Friday, November 30th, 2012

If you are anywhere in the Baltimore–DC–Wilimington–York, PA–Northern Virginia area and you appreciate the work of N.T. Wright, you may wish to consider my spring course at the Ecumenical Institute of Theology at St. Mary’s Seminary & University. This is a graduate course, but there are no prerequisites other than having a bacherlor’s degree with a decent GPA. The course is available for credit or audit.

BS/ST509/709 The Writings of N.T. Wright

Thursday, 6-9 p.m., January 14-March 21 (3 graduate credits)

[This is a combination biblical and systematic theology course offered at beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels.]

Course Description:

An exploration of some of the biblical, theological, and pastoral writings of the contemporary British Anglican scholar N.T. Wright, with attention to the significance of his work for the life of the church.

Course Requirements for all students:

1. Regular attendance and prepared participation in class discussion.

2. Five 100-word reaction posts online (not due when doing discussion-starter paper).

3. Two one-page discussion-starter papers, with summary and discussion questions.

4. One book review of 2,000 words.

5. Class presentation and final, synthetic paper of 2,000 words on some aspect of N. T. Wright’s writings.

Additional Requirement for 700-level students (matriculated degree and certificate candidates):

Same as above plus one additional book review on an additional book by N.T. Wright.

For C.A.S. (Certificate of Advanced Studies) students, the additional book must be a major work approved by the instructor.

Required Texts:

Kurt, Stephen. Tom Wright for Everyone: Putting the Theology of N.T. Wright into Practice in the Local Church. 978-0281063932.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). For All God’s Worth: The Worship and Calling of the Church. 978-0802843197.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). Simply Christian: Why Christianity Makes Sense. 978-0061920622.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). Simply Jesus: A New Vision of Who He Was, What He Did, and Why He Matters. 978-0062084392.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church. 978-0061551826.

Wright, N.T. (Tom). What Saint Paul Really Said: Was Paul of Tarsus the Real Founder of Christianity? 978-0802844453.

Some additional online reading and video viewing.

Recommended:

Perrin, Nicholas and Richard B. Hays, eds. Jesus, Paul, and the People of God. 978-0830838974.

Applications for the Ecumenical Institute’s 2013 spring term are due by Monday, December 3, though late applications will be considered. For admission requirements, go to http://www.stmarys.edu/ei/ei_adm_overview.htm, or contact Zenaida Bench at zbench@stmarys.edu or 410/864-4202. Registration continues until spring-term classes begin. See the course brochure at http://www.stmarys.edu/ei/ei_semester.htm for an overview of all of next term’s course offerings.

We believe there is no better way to begin study at the Ecumenical Institute than walking and talking with a friend (see Luke 24:13-14). To encourage that, we offer a one-time tuition incentive for new students who begin together: a tuition remission of 50% for both of you on your first “E.I.” course.

If you and someone you know are considering theological study, this is your opportunity to encourage one another to explore and discern together. You can take the same class or try different courses and compare notes.

Your walk begins with just one course… and may lead to…

  • more courses…
  • or perhaps a certificate in Biblical Studies, Faith Community/Parish Nursing, Religious Education, Spirituality, Urban Ministry, or Youth and Family Ministry…
  • or even a Master of Arts Degree in Theology or Church Ministries.

For more information, please contact the Ecumenical Institute office at ei@stmarys.edu or 410/864-4200.

Inaugural Lecture PLUS a Seminar on Paul Nov. 8-9

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

Nov. 8: Raymond E. Brown Inaugural Lecture and

Nov. 9: A Morning with the Apostle Paul (and Friends)

If you are anywhere near Baltimore, you are cordially invited!!

On Thursday, November 8 I will deliver my inaugural lecture as the first holder of the Raymond E. Brown Chair in Biblical Studies and Theology at St. Mary’s Seminary & University. The topic will be “The Death of the Messiah: Theology, Spirituality, Politics.” A book sale and signing will precede the lecture at 7 p.m., and a period of dialogue will follow. This event, which is also this year’s Dunning Lecture, is free and open to the public.
Click for lecture information.

On the morning after the lecture, the conversation will continue as other biblical scholars and theologians (Richard Hays, Kathy Grieb, Fr. Tom Stegman, and Brent Laytham) will join me for “A Morning with the Apostle Paul (and Friends),” a discussion of some of the themes from my work on Paul and their significance both for understanding Paul and for the life and mission of the church today. Advance registration for this seminar is required, and space is limited.
Click for seminar details and registration form.

A New Essay in a New Book on Revelation

Saturday, June 16th, 2012

In September 2010 I was part of an international symposium on the book of Revelation held at Duke University. The papers from that very stimulating event are about to be published (July 15) in a volume from Baylor University Press entitled Revelation and the Politics of Apocalyptic Interpretation, edited by Richard B. Hays and Stefan Alkier.

The table of contents follows:

1 What Has the Spirit Been Saying? Theological and Hermeneutical Reflections on the Reception/Impact History of the Book of Revelation (me)

2 Models for Intertextual Interpretation of Revelation (Steve Moyise)

3 The Reception of Daniel 7 in the Revelation of John (Thomas Hieke)

4 Faithful Witness, Alpha and Omega: The Identity of Jesus in the Apocalypse of John (Richard Hays)

5 God, Israel, and Ecclesia in the Apocalypse (Joseph Mangina)

6 Revelation and Christian Hope: Political Implications of the Revelation to John (N. T. Wright)

7 Witness or Warrior? How the Book of Revelation Can Help Christians Live Their Political Lives (Stefan Alkier)

8 The Apocalypse in the Framework of the Canon (Tobias Nicklas)

9 Reading What Is Written in the Book of Life: Theological Interpretation of the Book of Revelation Today (Marianne Meye Thompson)

The book blurbs follow:

“For many Revelation has effectively been decanonized—mostly little read and even less understood. This fine collection ventures into intertextual, canonical, theological, and political readings of the book that advance theological reflection on the significance of Revelation for today.”

—Joel B. Green, Professor of New Testament Interpretation & Associate Dean for the Center for Advanced Theological Studies, Fuller Theological Seminary

“A splendid collection. This volume will help both the seasoned and the skittish interpret Revelation within its canonical context, and thereby move the academy and the church within hearing distance of apocalyptic texts in the gospels and epistles.”

—Eugene Boring, I. Wylie Briscoe Professor of New Testament, Emeritus, Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University

If you are interested in Revelation, you will want to get this book, along (I would suggest) with Reading Revelation Responsibly (a bit lighter reading!).

Bible and Spirituality Symposium in England

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

I have just finished participating in a stimulating international symposium on the Bible and (Christian) spirituality at the University of Gloucestershire in Cheltenham, England. It was sponsored by the University’s Centre for the Bible and Spirituality and the British Bible Society. Participants and topics included (not the full list):

  • Stephen Barton (retired, Durham): Joy in Luke-Acts and Paul
  • Richard Briggs (Cranmer Hall, Durham): Daniel as spiritual reader of Scripture
  • Stephen Chapman (Duke): The Amalek texts and Christian spirituality
  • Ellen Davis (Duke): Literal Jerusalem in Christian spirituality
  • Pieter de Villiers (Free State, S. Africa): Love in Galatians
  • Andrew Lincoln (Gloucestershire): Colossians and spiritual formation
  • Gordon McConville (Gloucestershire): Spiritual formation through the Psalms
  • Walter Moberly (Durham): Job and spiritual wisdom
  • Lloyd Pietersen (Gloucestershire): Spirituality of persecution in 2 Tim and the Anabaptist martyrs
  • Sandra Schneiders (GTU Berkeley): Method in NT spirituality
  • and yours truly: The this-worldliness of NT spirituality

The conversation was wonderful, collegial, and promising. The papers will be published in a volume from Wipf and Stock, due out in about a year.

Hauerwas on the Death of America’s (Protestant) God

Sunday, January 8th, 2012

This piece from last August by my friend Stanley Hauerwas of Duke, about to retire from there and also the outgoing president of the Society of Christian Ethics, is worth pondering. A few excerpts:

America is the first great experiment in Protestant social formation. Protestantism in Europe always assumed and depended on the cultural habits that had been created by Catholic Christianity. America is the first place Protestantism did not have to define itself over against a previous Catholic culture. So America is the exemplification of constructive Protestant social thought.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer thus got it right when he characterized American Protestantism as “Protestantism without Reformation.”

That is why it has been possible for Americans to synthesize three seemingly antithetical traditions: evangelical Protestantism, republican political ideology and commonsense moral reasoning. For Americans, faith in God is indistinguishable from loyalty to their country.

American Protestants do not have to believe in God because they believe in belief. That is why we have never been able to produce an interesting atheist in America. The god most Americans say they believe in is just not interesting enough to deny. Thus the only kind of atheism that counts in America is to call into question the proposition that everyone has a right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Consequently, America did not need to have an established church because it was assumed that the church was virtually established by the everyday habits of public life.

Protestantism came to America to make America Protestant. It was assumed that was to be done through faith in the reasonableness of the common man and the establishment of a democratic republic. But in the process the church in America became American – or, as [historian Mark] Noll puts it, “because the churches had done so much to make America, they could not escape living with what they had made.”

As a result Americans continue to maintain a stubborn belief in a god, but the god they believe in turns out to be the American god. To know or worship that god does not require that a church exist because that god is known through the providential establishment of a free people.

America is the great experiment in Protestant social thought, but the society Protestants created now threatens to make Protestantism unintelligible to itself. Put as directly as I can, I believe we may be living at a time when we are watching Protestantism, at least the kind of Protestantism we have in America, come to an end. It is dying of its own success.

It is impossible to avoid the fact that American Christianity is far less than it should have been just to the extent that the church has failed to make clear that America’s god is not the God that Christians worship.

We are now facing the end of Protestantism. America’s god is dying. Hopefully, that will leave the church in America in a position where it has nothing to lose. And when you have nothing to lose, all you have left is the truth.

So I am hopeful that God may yet make the church faithful – even in America.

Daniel Kirk talks about his new Jesus-Paul Book

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

Daniel Kirk of Fuller Seminary talks about his new book, Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul…?, a book I endorsed and called a page-turner. Have a listen and buy the book at your nearest independent Christian/theological bookstore, such as Hearts and Minds in Dallastown, PA.

Update: part 2, part 3, part 4.

Tom Wright on Three Recent Jesus Books

Monday, December 19th, 2011

Tom Wright reviews recent books by the Pope, Maurice Casey, and Bruce Fisk on Jesus, which (he suggests) represent premodern, modern, and postmodern approaches, respectively. He lauds their interest in Jesus’ rootedness in the Scriptures and Second Temple Judaism but decries their inability to see the centrality and meaning of the kingdom of God for Jesus. His own recent book Simply Jesus attempts to do both. (HT Dan Reid on FB)

N.T. Wright Video on his new book “Simply Jesus”

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

Look here (sorry it’s Fox News) for a fine interview with Tom Wright on his new book Simply Jesus.


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