Recent Lectures Online

August 29th, 2017

Some of my recent lectures are online as video and/or audio. Here are a few links:

 

  1. E. P. Wahl Lectures, Taylor Seminary, Edmonton, March 2016: four on Romans and mission
  2. Ekklesia Project 2017 Gathering, Chicago, Jul 2017: one on Paul and peace (scroll down)
  3. Didsbury Lectures, Nazarene Theological College, Manchester, Eng., October 2016: four on John and mission (scroll down)
  4. Payton Lectures, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA, April 2016: two on John and mission

 

When Caution does not Suffice: Reflections on the Current Presidency

August 25th, 2017

This is a long follow-up to my Facebook post about Donald Trump and the Fiddler on the Roof (see the end of this piece).

When the President speaks with a teleprompter, that is not Donald Trump speaking. Donald Trump’s largely non-teleprompter “speech” Tuesday night (8/22/17)—despite his appeal to earlier remarks allegedly condemning racists and white supremacists—was once again implicitly racist and pro-Nazi, and explicitly supportive of illegal activity (that of the convicted sheriff), in addition to being mean-spirited toward anyone who questions or disagrees with anything he says or stands for, including a U.S. senator battling brain cancer.

Writing in today’s Washington Post (8/25/17), former longtime Republican senator John Danforth says this: “As has been true since our beginning, we Republicans are the party of Lincoln, the party of the Union. We believe in our founding principle [that of a united country]. We are proud of our illustrious history. We believe that we are an essential part of present-day American politics. Our country needs a responsibly conservative party. But our party has been corrupted by this hateful man, and it is now in peril. In honor of our past and in belief in our future, for the sake of our party and our nation, we Republicans must disassociate ourselves from Trump by expressing our opposition to his divisive tactics and by clearly and strongly insisting that he does not represent what it means to be a Republican” (emphasis added).

Mr. Danforth does not go far enough. Former Bush-speechwriter Michael Gerson, also in today’s Post, starts to go a bit further as he (like me above) calls out the real, non-teleprompter, Phoenix-side of Donald Trump: “Trump deserves a patent on the idea that political authenticity means spontaneity. So it was the real voice that we heard in Phoenix, attacking a man with brain cancer — Republican Sen. John McCain — without any wish for his recovery. The real voice defending a supporter who had been fired by CNN for writing ‘Sieg Heil’ on Twitter. The real voice making fun of a TV anchor’s height. The real voice again widening racial divisions by defending Confederate monuments as ‘our history and our heritage.’ (Instead of the royal ‘we,’ the white ‘we.’) It was the real voice expressing greater passion in criticizing journalists than white supremacists.”

Gerson’s next sentence is a stark but truthful one: “Trump dares us to take him at face value. His self-revelation comes unbidden, even involuntarily. And his transparency reveals a disordered personality” (emphasis added).

Gerson goes on to discuss some of Trump’s odd claims Tuesday night, then commenting as follows: “What if Trump really believes what he claims? Then he would be not deceptive, but deluded. A deluded man in charge of North Korean policy. A deluded man who could employ nuclear weapons at a moment’s notice (actually two to three minutes to order a launch)…. Trump is not merely acting unpresidential; he is erratic and grandiose” (emphasis added).

But even Gerson does not go far enough, concluding simply that “Trump’s version of reality appears to make another Republican legislative and political disaster inevitable. The unified control of House, Senate and presidency means little when the president lives in a reality of his own.”

Unfortunately, this cautious final paragraph is an anti-climactic, insufficient, and perhaps even illogical conclusion to the charge of presidential delusion and personality disorder. There is a time when caution is wise and prudent, a virtue. There is a time when caution becomes a vice. I don’t blame Gerson and Danforth for wanting to be prudent, but perhaps now prudence (in the sense of good judgment) requires something other than caution.

It seems to me, in light of the last two weeks, that many (and perhaps most) people in the U.S. now realize what some of us here and many around the world have thought all along but have been hesitant to say publicly: the current President is morally (and otherwise) unqualified for such an office. They—including Mr. Danforth and Mr. Gerson—intuitively know, in the words of the 25th Amendment, that he is “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” If that is true, unless he repents (meaning both confession of sin and radical behavioral change—and that is the only adequate word for what he needs to do, yet it is nearly impossible for a deluded and disordered person), it now falls to those who have blindly supported him, those who have worked with him and do work with him, the cautious critics, etc., if they have any integrity, to call for and find the quickest way to effect his removal from office. For the sake of African Americans and Jews. For the sake of refugees and immigrants. For the sake of the Republican party. For the sake of this country. For the sake of East Asia. For the sake of the world.

I suspect that Mr. Danforth and Mr. Gerson feel similarly, but caution prevents them from saying implicitly what their critiques imply.

I have no delusions that the current Vice President should actually be President, but perhaps he would at least stop being a puppet for the man who is currently his boss. We can pray as much.

I do not say any of this lightly, and I obviously do not expect everyone to agree, but I would hope that people would at least take these thoughts seriously. (Feel free to discuss this in a civil manner here—but only in a civil manner.)

 

*Facebook post of 8/23/17: Early in Fiddler on the Roof, the rabbi is asked if there is a blessing for the czar. He wisely answers, “Yes: May God bless him and keep him—far away from us.” There might be a similar appropriate blessing for Donald Trump: “May God bless him and keep him—far away from us, and far away from the nuclear codes.”

Some Early Reviews of the 2nd Edition of Apostle of the Crucified Lord

May 5th, 2017

Some early reviews of the new edition have appeared online, by Nijay Gupta, Philip Long, and William Hemsworth. I am grateful for their appreciative words.

The blurbs for the book are also quite encouraging, though they are not new:

N. T. Wright
—University of St. Andrews
“Michael Gorman enviably combines simplicity of presentation with profound originality. The present work, enhanced in this new edition, is simultaneously an accessible textbook and an exposition of challenging new ideas which all Pauline scholars must take seriously. A book to draw in the beginner and to compel the expert into fresh reflection.”

Douglas A. Campbell
—Duke Divinity School
“Gorman’s learned, sustained, inclusive advocacy of participation as the center of Paul’s gospel is one of the key features of the modern scholarly landscape. This second edition of his balanced yet probing introduction to Paul’s thought is therefore profoundly welcome.”

Michael F. Bird
—Ridley College, Melbourne
“The best introduction to Paul and his letters just got better!”

Frank J. Matera
—Catholic University of America
“I have used Michael Gorman’s introduction to Paul with both undergraduate and graduate students. In my experience it is the best available introduction to Paul and his letters. Theological as well as historical and literary in its approach, it introduces students to what they need to know about Paul and his letters. The appearance of this revised and updated edition is good news for all who love and teach Paul.”

Susan Eastman
—Duke Divinity School
“In this accessible book written for a wide audience, Gorman charts a journey to the transformative heart of Paul’s gospel: the crucified and resurrected Messiah.”

Cities of Paul and John Study Tour: April 17-29, 2017

May 12th, 2016

Study Tour
The Cities of Paul and John
The Best of Turkey, Greece, and Rome

April 17-29, 2017

A once-in-a-lifetime and potentially life-changing experience!

Join me for my eighth (and possibly last) study tour to the cities of Paul and John. Participants may take the trip as a course for credit (graduate or undergraduate—reading and writing required) or just as an educational and spiritual adventure. Family members (18+) and friends are welcome.

Included: Roundtrip air from Washington, DC, including current air taxes and fuel surcharges (taxes and fuel charges are subject to change); 11 nights lodging at 4-star hotels; breakfast and dinner daily; full-time English-speaking tour escorts; air-conditioned deluxe motor coach; all guides, entrances, touring and transportation as appears on itinerary; baggage handling at hotels (one piece).

Not included: all lunches; drinks with meals; Turkey Visa (must purchase online prior to travel); tips to driver, guides, hotel staff (required; approx. $100-$120; collected at departure); optional travel insurance; fee for paying for trip by credit card (3-5%); transportation to and from airport (probably Dulles).

Highlights: Morning prayer en route to sites; great fellowship with an interesting, diverse group of people; expert guiding; Scripture reading and discussion of relevant texts on site; encounters with people from other cultures and their countries; pre-trip and in-trip recommended reading.

Finances: Approx. $4,500 as of May 12, 2016 (subject to final airline fares and taxes); cost is based on double occupancy (single-room supplement = approx. $600); deposit due late fall.

Tentative Itinerary as of May 12. 2016 (subject to minor changes)

Monday Day 1 Depart Washington DC

Tuesday Day 2 Arrive in Izmir (Smyrna); visit Smyrna agora; drive to Kusadasi (ON Kusadasi)

Wednesday Day 3 Ephesus: main site including terrace houses and St. Paul caves (ON Kusadasi)

Thursday Day 4 Ephesus: museum and Mary’s House; travel inland (ON Pamukkale)

Friday Day 5 Laodicea; Hierapolis (ON Pamukkale)

Saturday Day 6 Colossae; Sardis (ON Bergma)

Sunday Day 7 Pergamum (Acropolis and Asclepeion); fly Izmir-Athens (ON Athens)

Monday Day 8 Athens: Acropolis, Mars Hill, Forum, Archaeological Museum; panoramic drive (ON Athens)

Tuesday Day 9 Corinth, Acrocorinth, Isthmia, Cenchreae (ON Athens)

Wednesday Day 10 Fly Athens-Rome; Roman Forum and Colosseum (ON Rome)

Thursday, Day 11 Rome: St. John Lateran, Appian Way, Catacombs, and St. Paul Outside the Walls Basilica (ON Rome)

Friday, Day 12 Rome: Vatican (Museums and Sistine Chapel), St. Peter’s Basilica; walking tour of the old city; special farewell dinner (ON Rome)

Saturday, Day 13 Flight home

Further information and to get on the mailing list for updates
Prof. Michael J. Gorman: mgorman@stmarys.edu

“Reading John Missionally” Lectures Online

April 14th, 2016

My Fuller Theological Seminary Payton Lectures on “Reading John Missionally” from April 6-7 are now available in audio format at the Fuller web site.

Lectures at Moody Bible Institute and Fuller Seminary April 4, 6-7

March 29th, 2016

If you are in the Chicago area, I will be giving a lecture for the Moody Student Theological Society at the Moody Bible Institute next Monday, April 4 at 7:00 pm in room Sweeting 211. It is open to the public. The title of the lecture is “Salvation Through Crucifixion: Paul’s Theology of Participating in Christ.” But don’t worry too much–there will be plenty of resurrection in the talk.

I will also be giving the Payton Lectures at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday and Thursday, April 6-7. The theme is “Reading John Missionally.” The first lecture is titled “Missional Gospel, Missional Jesus: The Gospel of Abundant Life.” The second is “Abide and Go: John’s Missional Spirituality.”

All lectures are open to the public, but at Fuller you need to arrive early and register.

Participation in God’s Mission at Northeastern Seminary

March 15th, 2016

I will be at Northeastern Seminary in Chili, NY (Rochester) for their theology conference on Participation in God’s Mission this Friday and Saturday. If you are in the area, come by for the Friday night free lecture. The Saturday event has a fee, but there is a keynote from me and then some 40 choices for academic papers.

Friday evening’s 7:30 lecture is entitled “Paul, the Mission of God, and the Contemporary Church.”

Peace and the Gospel: “Peace in Paul and Luke”

October 23rd, 2015

Some of you may be interested in this little book I just published on peace.

SBL Suggestions for Atlanta 2015

October 21st, 2015

Following are the 2015 sessions of the SBL and AAR groups of which I am in one way or another a part, either on the steering committee, as a participant this year, or as the father of a participant (Mark is delivering a paper). If you go to everything listed here, you will have very little free time–and you will have to bilocate! (Of course I am not listing all the great SBL sessions!) My own direct involvement is chairing a session on C.S. Lewis and the Bible and responding to a panel review of my book Becoming the Gospel.

Saturday

S21-148 Theological Interpretation of Scripture
Saturday 11/21/2015

9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Grand Ballroom B (Level 2) – Hilton

Theme: Theological Interpretation of Daniel in the MT and LXX
All papers will be read in their entirety.

 

Thomas Holsinger-Friesen, Spring Arbor University, Presiding (5 min)
Richard S. Briggs, University of Durham
The Eclipse of Daniel’s Narrative: The Limits of Historical Knowledge in the Theological Reading of Daniel (25 min)
Discussion (5 min)
Tim Meadowcroft, Laidlaw College
“One Like a Son of Man” in the Court of the Foreign King (25 min)
Discussion (5 min)
Break (5 min)
Bogdan G. Bucur, Duquesne University
Christological and Trinitarian Exegesis of Daniel 7 in Early Christianity (25 min)
Discussion (5 min)
Jennie Grillo, Duke University
Reading Resurrection in the Additions to Daniel (25 min)
Discussion (5 min)
Discussion (20 min)

 

P21-123 GOCN Forum on Missional Hermeneutics
Saturday 11/21/2015
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Room: Courtland (Atlanta Conference Level) – Hyatt

Theme: Biblical Formation of the Congregation for Missional Witness
This session of the GOCN Forum on Missional Hermeneutics includes papers on the theology and practice of biblical formation in the faith community: that is, the role of the Bible and its interpretation in the process of forming “Scripture-shaped communities” (Richard Hays) for mission in the world, in concrete contexts.

 

James C. Miller, Asbury Theological Seminary, Presiding (5 min)
Mark Glanville, Trinity College – Bristol
Radical Gratitude and the Mission of God: Nourishing Celebration and Inclusivism in Local Congregations in light of the Festival Calendar (Deut 16:1-17) (25 min)
Boaz Johnson, North Park University
Missional Theology and Congregation Formation in the Torah (25 min)
Michael Barram, Saint Mary’s College of California
To Serve God and Not Mammon: Reading Matthew 6 as Missionally Located Formation for Economic Discipleship (25 min)
Break (5 min)
Mark Labberton, Fuller Theological Seminary, Respondent (25 min)
Discussion (40 min)

 

S21-249 Theological Interpretation of Scripture
Saturday 11/21/2015
1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Room: A602 (Atrium Level) – Marriott

Theme: Trinity in/and the Bible
All papers will be read in their entirety.

 

Brent Laytham, Saint Mary’s Seminary and University, Presiding
Murray Rae, University of Otago
Biblical Foundations of a Trinitarian Hermeneutic (20 min)
Discussion (5 min)
Mark S. Gignilliat, Beeson Divinity School, Samford University
Wish Fulfillment or Real Presence? The Old Testament’s Trinity (20 min)
Andrea D. Saner, Eastern Mennonite University
Trinitarian Judgments in/and the Book of Exodus (20 min)
Discussion (10 min)
Break (5 min)
Matthew Bates, Quincy University
Christology of Divine Identity? Septuagintal Dialogues in the New Testament as Trinitarian Critique (20 min)
Wesley Hill, Trinity School for Ministry
Paul and the Narratable Divine Identity (20 min)
Discussion (10 min)
Discussion (20 min)

 

Sunday

S22-147/A22-121 Theological Interpretation of Scripture
Sunday 11/22/2015
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: A704 (Atrium Level) – Marriott

Theme: Bonhoeffer as Theological Interpreter
This session is co-sponsored with the Bonhoeffer: Theology and Social Analysis Group (AAR). Papers will be read in their entirety. This session investigates aspects of Bonhoeffer as a theological interpreter of Christian scripture. Papers explore Bonhoeffer’s own exegetical practice and its application in particular cases, examine the role of exegesis in the construction of Bonhoeffer’s own distinctive theological positions, and consider Bonhoeffer’s understanding of scripture and its consequences for contemporary debates about theological exegesis.

 

Myk Habets, Carey Baptist College, Presiding (5 min)
R. Walter Moberly, University of Durham
Bonhoeffer’s “Creation and Fall” Revisited (25 min)
Tyler Atkinson, Bethany College (KS)
Bonhoeffer, Qoheleth, and the “Natural Joy of Bodily Life” (25 min)
Discussion (10 min)
Break (5 min)
Chris Dodson, University of Aberdeen
“The Person Who Receives Blessing . . . Must Also Suffer Much”: Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Wilhelm Herrmann, and a Hermeneutic of Suffering (25 min)
Derek W. Taylor, Duke University
Nonreligious and yet Theological: Bonhoeffer’s Interpretation in a World Come of Age (25 min)
Discussion (10 min)
Discussion (20 min)

 

S22-211 Christian Theology and the Bible
Sunday 11/22/2015
1:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Room: International 5 (International Level) – Marriott

Theme: Special Session on C.S. Lewis and the Bible
This session concentrates upon the relationship between biblical scholarship and the figure of C. S. Lewis. Lewis himself was a specialist in medieval and Renaissance English literature, yet he was well known even before his death (on the same day as John F. Kennedy) as an apologist for Christianity, an author of semi-popular theological studies, and a writer of fiction informed by the Bible. His work on the Bible and academic biblical scholarship appears mainly in essays and letters, in passing throughout his fiction and monographs, and in biblical imagery and allusions in various works. Of particular interest is his use of polyvalence and narrative to explore debated or complex questions, his reactionary dismissal of quests for the historical Jesus and much of the historical-critical method, and his integration of biblical themes with symbols and concepts from various diverse contexts. Lewis is a writer whose continuing impact upon various readerships is undeniable, though he is less celebrated among biblical scholars and theologians than among those outside these guilds. Investigation into how he both confirms and challenges the assumptions of standard biblical scholarship provides a helpful bridge between biblical scholars and the broader constituency that continues to appreciate his work.

 

Michael J. Gorman, Saint Mary’s Seminary and University, Presiding
Leslie Baynes, Missouri State University
Lewis vs. Bultmann: Myth as Fact or Fiction? (30 min)
Patrick Gray, Rhodes College
C.S. Lewis and the Historical Jesus in the Screwtape Letters (30 min)
Myk Habets, Carey Baptist College
Mere Christianity for Mere Gods: C.S. Lewis and Theosis (30 min)
Edith M. Humphrey, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary
Checking the Demon and Saying What’s to Be Said (30 min)
Kevin Vanhoozer, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Respondent (15 min)
Discussion (15 min)

 

S22-235 Pauline Soteriology
Sunday 11/22/2015
1:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Room: A602 (Atrium Level) – Marriott

Theme: Paul, Poverty, and the Powers

 

Richard Hays, Duke University, Presiding
Bruce W. Longenecker, Baylor University
Malignant Forces, Perpetual Poverty, and the Body of Christ: Theologizing toward an Eschatological Reality (30 min)
Robert Moses, High Point University
Paul, Poverty, and the Powers: The Body of Christ as Response (30 min)
Break (10 min)
A. Grieb, Virginia Theological Seminary, Respondent (15 min)
Luke Bretherton, Duke University, Respondent (15 min)
Discussion (50 min)

 

P22-318 GOCN Forum on Missional Hermeneutics
Sunday 11/22/2015
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: Marquis A-B (Marquis Level) – Marriott

Theme: Review Panel Discussion of Michael J. Gorman’s book, Becoming the Gospel: Paul, Participation, and Mission (Eerdmans, 2015)
As a leading voice among Pauline scholars, Michael J. Gorman has written a number of significant books and articles on Paul’s theology in recent years, including Cruciformity: Paul’s Narrative Theology of the Cross (2001) and Inhabiting the Cruciform God (2009). His most recent contribution, Becoming the Gospel: Paul, Participation, and Mission (Eerdmans, 2015), extends and develops some of the themes highlighted initially in earlier works, and places particular emphasis on mission as an interpretive rubric for the Pauline epistles—an outgrowth, in part, of his work with the GOCN Forum on Missional Hermeneutics. In the introduction to Becoming the Gospel, Gorman calls his “affiliation with the Forum” “one of the most important professional developments for me in recent years,” noting that “learning to read Paul missionally—not merely as the quintessential ‘missionary’ but as a formator of missional communities—has been an exhilarating experience” (p. 10). Specifically, Gorman argues that “theosis—Spirit-enabled transformative participation in the life and character of God revealed in the crucified and resurrected Messiah Jesus—is the starting point of mission and is, in fact, its proper theological framework” (p. 4). Please join us for what promises to be a fascinating panel discussion—including responses by a fellow Pauline scholar, a congregational pastor, a missiologist, and a theologian—followed by an open-ended conversation about the missiological dimensions of Paul’s theology as illuminated in Gorman’s work.

 

Sylvia Keesmaat, Trinity College, University of Toronto, Presiding (5 min)
Michael J. Gorman, Saint Mary’s Seminary and University, Panelist (20 min)
J. Ross Wagner, Duke University, Panelist (15 min)
Eunice McGarrahan, First Presbyterian Church, Colorado Springs, Panelist (15 min)
Break (5 min)
George Hunsberger, Western Theological Seminary, Panelist (15 min)
John Franke, Evangelische Theologische Faculteit, Leuven, Panelist (15 min)
Michael Gorman, Saint Mary’s Seminary and University, Panelist (20 min)
Discussion (40 min)

 

A22-329 Wesleyan Studies Group

Theme: Wesleyan Culture and the Public Square since the Mid-Twentieth Century

Edgardo Colon-Emeric, Duke University, Presiding

Sunday 11/22/2015 – 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Hilton-Grand Salon E (Level 2)

This session will focus on late twentieth and early twenty-first century leaders whose lives in the public square have been explicitly influenced by Wesleyan perspectives. Papers will draw direct connections between the person’s work in the public square and the influence of Methodism.

 

Dion Forster, Stellenbosch University

Nelson Mandela and the Methodist Church of South Africa: An African Christian Humanist Approach to Social Holiness

Mark Gorman, Centre United Methodist Church, Forest Hill, MD

The “Iconic” Methodist: George W. Bush and the State of Contemporary United Methodism

Natalya Cherry, Southern Methodist University

Rev. James M. Lawson, Jr., Called by King “The Greatest Teacher of Nonviolence in America”

Responding:

Rebekah Miles, Southern Methodist University

 

Monday

S23-133 Pauline Soteriology
Monday, 11/23/2015
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Marquis A-B (Marquis Level) – Marriott

Theme: Review of John Barclay, Paul and the Gift (Eerdmans 2015)

 

Alexandra Brown, Washington and Lee University, Presiding
Joel Marcus, Duke University, Panelist (20 min)
Margaret Mitchell, University of Chicago, Panelist (20 min)
Miroslav Volf, Yale University, Panelist (20 min)
Break (10 min)
John Barclay, University of Durham, Respondent (40 min)
Discussion (40 min)

 

P23-118 GOCN Forum on Missional Hermeneutics
Monday, 11/23/2015
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: University (Atlanta Conference Level) – Hyatt

Theme: Biblical Formation of the Congregation for Missional Witness
This session of the GOCN Forum on Missional Hermeneutics includes papers on the theology and practice of biblical formation in the faith community: that is, the role of the Bible and its interpretation in the process of forming “Scripture-shaped communities” (Richard Hays) for mission in the world, in concrete contexts.

 

Darrell Guder, Princeton Theological Seminary, Presiding (5 min)
Laura R. Levens, Baptist Seminary of Kentucky
Many Voices, Many Contexts, One Faith: Engaging the Breadth of Scripture to Form Discerning, Missional Congregations (25 min)
Luke Ben Tallon, LeTourneau University and Aaron Kuecker, LeTourneau University
A Liturgy of Ascent and a Life of Ascent: Conforming Congregations to Christian Scripture (25 min)
Derek W. Taylor, Duke University
Forming Faithful Readers: Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Missional Hermeneutic (25 min)
Break (5 min)
Benjamin T. Conner, Western Theological Seminary, Respondent (25 min)
Discussion (40 min)

 

S23-314 Christian Theology and the Bible
Monday 11/23/2015
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: Hanover E (Exhibit Level) – Hyatt

Theme: Spiritual Interpretation of Scripture
This panel will consider the relationship between spirituality and the Bible. Each panelist will respond briefly to the question, “What are the hallmarks of the spiritual interpretation of Scripture?” There will be time for discussion among the panelists as well as substantial time for Q&A and discussion between the panelists and those attending the session.

 

Pieter De Villiers, University of the Free State, Presiding (15 min)
Gordon McConville, University of Gloucestershire, Panelist (15 min)
Bo Karen Lee, Princeton Theological Seminary, Panelist (15 min)
Andrew Lincoln, University of Gloucestershire, Panelist (15 min)
Kathryn Greene-McCreight, Panelist (15 min)
Discussion (75 min)

 

Tuesday

S24-112 Christian Theology and the Bible
Tuesday 11/24/2015
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Hanover F (Exhibit Level) – Hyatt

Theme: The Anagogical Interpretation of Scripture
This session will focus on the anagogical interpretation of Scripture; it is the fourth and final session in our series exploring the traditional four senses of Scripture (literal, allegorical, tropological, anagogical). In brief, anagogical sense of Scripture is the exegesis of Scripture in relation to eschatological hope and the life to come. Each of the invited panelists will respond to the following questions: respond to the following questions: “What is the role of the anagogical sense of Scripture in the figure or area that you study? And, why is the anagogical sense a significant and important way to read Scripture?”

Arthur M. Sutherland, Loyola University Maryland, Presiding
Hans Boersma, Regent College
Purity, Perfection, and Beatific Vision: The Upward Journey to Christ in Gregory of Nyssa (30 min)
Kevin L. Hughes, Villanova University
Ecclesia contemplativa: On the Relationship between the Mystical and Eschatological in St. Bonaventure’s Anagogia (30 min)
Eboni Marshall Turman, Duke University
Black. Life. Matter. Toward A Black Feminist/Womanist Eschatology (30 min)
Francesca Murphy, University of Notre Dame
The Bible and the Analogical Imagination (30 min)
Discussion (30 min)

John 15 and Mission: Preview 1 of my New Book on Missional Hermeneutics

October 8th, 2015

During my sabbatical in 2015-2016, I am working on a new book in missional hermeneutics, this time (unlike Becoming the Gospel) focusing on the non-Pauline NT literature. I will be posting occasional excerpts of that work, in draft form, on these pages from time to time. Since I am beginning “in the beginning,” to so speak (that is, with the Gospel of John), the first posts will be about that gospel. Here is something on John 15:

In John 15 we find a creative and significant paradoxical tension within the text between the main verb, “abide” (menein; eleven times), on the one hand, and the verbs “do” (poiein; v. 4) and especially “go” (hypag?te; v. 16), on the other. Semantically, the former has to do with resting, staying put; it connotes, or could connote, spiritual ease or even apathy. The latter, however, has to do with moving, acting. This tension is expressed in, but not fully resolved by, the image of an abiding, fruit-bearing branch, for although healthy vines and branches naturally grow and bear fruit, they do not naturally move from place to place. The disciples, however, have been appointed to go. They constitute, in other words, a mobile vine, a community of centripetally oriented love that shares that love centrifugally as they move out from themselves, all the while abiding in the vine, the very source of their life and love, the source of their power to do.

Here is perhaps the most powerful symbiosis of spirituality and mission in the New Testament. This chapter, rooted in John 13-14 and further developed in John 16-17, is the quintessence of a participatory missiology. But it is even more than that; it expresses a profound theology of missional perichoresis and theosis (mutual indwelling of Christ and the disciples leading to transformation into Christlike Godlikeness). Fruit bearing is participating in the missio Dei embodied in Christ—to bring God’s light, love, and life to the world—and truly is the way we become more fully what we already are: Jesus’ disciples (15:8).


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